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Color (6th Edition)

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A colour wheel is a perceptual tool for arranging and working with colours, traditionally used by artists when painting, that came to be when Newton proposed to wrap the visible spectrum around a circle (Gurney 2010, p.74-75). The colours of a particular model is laid out in a circle, or wheel, with the primary colours positioned evenly at each third. Secondary colours are found in-between the primary colours while tertiary colours are located in-between the primary and secondary colours (Zelanski & Fisher 2007, p.154-155). Hues are found along the rim of the wheel, while the gradation toward the centre typically describes saturation, or chroma.

A colour wheel is a perceptual tool for arranging and working with colours, traditionally used by artists when painting, that came to be when Newton proposed to wrap the visible spectrum around a circle (Gurney 2010, p.74-75). The colours of a particular model is laid out in a circle, or wheel, with the primary colours positioned evenly at each third. Secondary colours are found in-between the primary colours while tertiary colours are located in-between the primary and secondary colours (Zelanski & Fisher 2007, p.154-155). Hues are found along the rim of the wheel, while the gradation toward the centre typically describes saturation, or chroma.

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Ruth Zelanski “Acetabularia Ring” anello in argento

Paul Zelanski was born in Hartford, Connecticut in 1931. He studied at The Cooper Union in New York, served in the military, and then enrolled at Yale University where he studied with Josef Albers. He was greatly influenced by Albers's teaching, especially color theory, and after receiving his BFA at Yale in 1957, and on Albers's recommendation, Zelanski attended Bowling Green State University for his MFA in painting, graduating in 1958. He then moved to Texas to teach at North Texas State University, and in 1962 joined the faculty of the University of Connecticut as Professor of Art, where he remained until retiring in 1995.